Do You Love Your Book?

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

I love this article! I often feel guilty about my unfinished projects. As children, we’re often taught to finish what we start. In general, I think that’s good advice, but part of being a ‘good’ writer means knowing when a story isn’t working and giving ourselves permission to put it aside. I’m not saying we should give up every time a story gets tough. But if a project is no longer giving you joy and you dread sitting down in front of the computer, maybe it’s time to put the story on the back burner, at least for a while. Wonderful post!

Originally posted on :

My first book took the longest time to write because I spent a lot of time angsting over every tiny little detail of it, and backtracking all the time, although angst or not, I loved every step of the process. These days I write much faster. A couple of times though, I’ve started a story and it’s taken days just to get a paragraph down. I’m a stubborn old mule though so I generally used to try and persevere, and force myself on. Not anymore though. Even though I’m one of the write every day tribe whether you feel like it or not, and I do write every day, I don’t see any point in carrying on with writing something I don’t love just because I started it.

It got me wondering how many writers try to force themselves to write something that they really don’t want to write, thinking…

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#Read #Authors – #Copyright #Infringement #Notification…

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

This is great advice from Chris the Story Reading Ape. Please read1

Originally posted on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog:

copyright-culprit

I have been hearing from a LOT recently that more SCAM BOOK SITES are appearing online in ever increasing numbers…

What can YOU do about it?

If you are an author and YOUR book(s) are being offered without your permission – issue DMCA Notices (SEE BELOW FIRST)

If you are a readerPLEASE DO NOT USE THESE SITES!

It may be tempting to get books FOR FREE or at greatly reduced prices but…

They may be a click farm looking for your email

and you will be infected with a virus.

*****

AUTHORS – VERY IMPORTANT!!!

DO NOT SEND THE OFFENDING SITE A DIRECT NOTICE.

If they are on Facebook – Use Facebook’s reporting form to remove their link source from Facebook’s server.

My attorney warns me not to click on them, but to send a form letter to their server.

You can find out their server here:

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Let’s Talk About Trigger Warnings

This is a post I’ve been thinking about for a while. It’s about trigger warnings. When are they appropriate? And who decides what content is controversial or upsetting?

I started thinking a great deal about trigger warnings when I released Sweet Sorrow a couple of weeks ago. For a while, I was on the fence about adding a trigger warning, but I finally came to the conclusion that although the book isn’t graphic, I should give readers an opportunity to make an informed decision before reading.

I’ve used trigger warnings in the past. I used one with The Fifth Circle because that book deals with sexual abuse, domestic abuse, and mental illness. There are some graphic, disturbing scenes and I felt that it would be important to add a trigger warning for those who are dealing with their own issues and are trying to avoid books that contain such subject matter.

I understand it isn’t possible to put trigger warnings on everything, nor is it possible to list every conceivable trigger. I don’t think trigger warnings should be mandatory, but as an independent author who has control over my book blurb, I would like to help readers avoid an acute panic attack if I possibly can. After all, I don’t want to tread on someone’s recovery when, for me, it’s as simple as adding a sentence at the end of the blurb.

Trigger warnings aren’t about avoiding hurt feelings or preventing offense. I use trigger warnings to let readers know when there is content depicting abuse or violence, but I’m sure there’s other subject matter in my books readers might find offensive. Some people might be offended by the interracial romance in one of my books. Or they might be offended by the foul language in another. Like I said, this isn’t about preventing readers from being offended. I use trigger warnings to help readers who might be struggling with PTSD and anxiety resulting from abuse or sexual assault. Other authors might choose to identity other triggers. And, yes, other authors might choose not to use trigger warnings at all.

I would really like to have a thoughtful discussion about the use of trigger warnings. I’d love to hear your opinion; however, please don’t leave comments about how our society is sissified and how when we were kids, bullying built character, and parents beat their kids for their own good, and yada yada. Please be sensitive. There are some people dealing with truly horrific trauma, and I don’t want to make light of their pain. “Get over it and move on” is not helpful advice.

What do you think? Are there any authors out there who have added trigger warnings to your book descriptions? As readers, do you find trigger warnings helpful? When are they necessary? Are they necessary at all?

#Read NEW RELEASE ‘Sweet Sorrow’ by #Author Tricia Drammeh #FREE 9th to 12th April

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

So excited to be on Chris the Story Reading Ape’s blog. Do you want to find out how to get a free copy of Sweet Sorrow? Stop by Chris’ blog to find out how.

Originally posted on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog:

SweetSorrowebook (5)

Genre: Young Adult Romance

Rowan achieves her greatest desire when she earns the part of Juliet in the school play, but it’s impossible to concentrate on her lines when her secret crush is cast as Romeo. Eddie is a fallen football hero and the subject of widespread gossip. Not only has he lost the respect of his peers, he’s also earned the open animosity of Rowan’s father, the high school’s football coach. Eddie isn’t the only one with a tarnished past—Rowan has secrets of her own. When the truth is revealed, will Rowan replace Eddie as the most hated student in school, or will Rowan and Eddie share the stage together?

Amazon:

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Tricia Drammeh – an update on a new novel

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

Susan Toy is featuring Sweet Sorrow on Reading Recommendations! Please stop by and check it out.

Originally posted on Reading Recommendations:

Tricia Drammeh has previously been featured on Reading Recommendations. I have also listed Tricia as one of my All-Star Authors and I highly recommend her writing. Tricia is back now to tell us of a new release!

SweetSorrowebook (5)

Sweet Sorrow
by Tricia Drammeh
Young Adult Romance

Rowan achieves her greatest desire when she earns the part of Juliet in the school play, but it’s impossible to concentrate on her lines when her secret crush is cast as Romeo. Eddie is a fallen football hero and the subject of widespread gossip. Not only has he lost the respect of his peers, he’s also earned the open animosity of Rowan’s father, the high school’s football coach. Eddie isn’t the only one with a tarnished past—Rowan has secrets of her own. When the truth is revealed, will Rowan replace Eddie as the most hated student in school, or will Rowan and Eddie share…

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Guest Blogger Susan M. Toy

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

An excellent letter from an author to readers. I’ve discovered many excellent books through word of mouth. Reviews are appreciated, but a simple letter from a reader is probably the most amazing thing an author can receive. Thanks for writing this, Susan. And thank you, Amy, for posting this on your blog.

Originally posted on Reade and Write:

This week I would like to welcome guest blogger Susan M. Toy, whose blogs I enjoy very much and who has much to teach writers:

 KindReaders...ThankYou!!!

 joan didion quote

Kind Readers,

Since I am an Author, you mean the world to me, because without you the words I write have no meaning at all. So I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you, from the bottom of my heart, for taking the time to read what I write. You make me the Author that I am, and I owe you everything!

You, on the other hand, owe me nothing. You’ve done your bit by reading. You definitely do not owe me a written review on an online site – especially if you’re not used to writing reviews of whatever you read. I’m speaking for myself here when I say that…

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New Release! Sweet Sorrow is now on #Kindle

SweetSorrowebook (5)

I’m excited to announce the release of Sweet Sorrow, a novel for young adults. Sweet Sorrow is more than a simple love story between two teens. It also delves into some deeper issues that affect women of all ages. Here’s the blurb:

Rowan achieves her greatest desire when she earns the part of Juliet in the school play, but it’s impossible to concentrate on her lines when her secret crush is cast as Romeo. Eddie is a fallen football hero and the subject of widespread gossip. Not only has he lost the respect of his peers, he’s also earned the open animosity of Rowan’s father, the high school’s football coach. Eddie isn’t the only one with a tarnished past—Rowan has secrets of her own. When the truth is revealed, will Rowan replace Eddie as the most hated student in school, or will Rowan and Eddie share the stage together?

Sweet Sorrow is currently only available on Kindle. If you have Kindle Unlimited, you can begin reading it for free right now. If you don’t have KU, you can grab a free copy of the book beginning Thursday April 9th through Sunday April 12th. Please mark your calendars and feel free to share this post with your friends. I’m hoping lots of readers will take advantage of the free promotion.

Kindle US

Kindle UK

Kindle CA

Kindle AU

How to Write a Book Review

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

Excellent advice about writing a book review.

Originally posted on Susan Finlay Writes:

Before I became an author, I never wrote book reviews on Amazon. It never occurred to me that I should. I would read them, but I didn’t think it was my duty (or right) to write them. Since then, I’ve written numerous reviews. My husband has, too. What I’ve come to realize is that authors and readers need book reviews from all kinds of readers, not just from professional reviewers.

Authors look for reviews because they are putting their books out there to be read, and they long for feedback. They want to know that people aren’t only buying the books, but are actually reading them. Reviews also help the author (usually) because they help potential readers make a decision to give the book a chance.

I’ll give you an example: I recently got a Kindle Fire and started browsing for books on Amazon. That’s an eye-opening experience. The first…

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Clash of Legends: Book Review

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

The 7th book in Joleene Naylor’s Amaranthine series is finally here. This is easily one of the best vampire series I’ve ever read. If you love old-school vampires, you’ve got to try these books!

Originally posted on Authors to Watch:

Clash of Legends

(Amaranthine Book 7)

By Joleene Naylor

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The explosive seventh installment in the Amaranthine series brings blood, ruin, despair, and hope, for even in the darkest night there is still a moon.

After the battle in Indonesia. Katelina wakes in Samael’s domain. Though her memories are tattered, she knows someone is missing: Jorick.

Her vampire lover gathers an army to save her from the ancient, but his master Malick interferes. For five hundred years Malick has manipulated and ruined Jorick’s life. When he leaves Katelina broken and bleeding in the bowels of his oasis, it’s the final straw.

While Malick sets up his glorious war with a living legend, Jorick plans the ultimate taboo: to kill his master. He’s tried before and failed. Will this be different, or will he and Katelina be crushed in the carnage of a greater battle, between two whose blood goes back millennia?

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The short life and unlamented downfall of *Clean Reader* leads to musings on the reader-author relationship

Tricia Drammeh, Author:

I have to share this excellent and thought-provoking article about the reader/author relationship. Readers with an overblown sense of entitlement have taken “the customer is always right” to a new level.

Originally posted on Zen and the art of tightrope walking:

The short life and unlamented downfall of Clean Reader leads to musings on the reader-author relationship

Blink and you might have missed the kerfuffle. The so-called Clean Reader app offered the chance to read without sullying your precious mind with rude words and profanity by covering them with an alternative deemed acceptable by the app’s creators. However, the backlash from authors including Joanna Harris meant that very rapidly the company was obliged to remove all books from its catalogue. The app seems to still exist (so perhaps my blog headline might be misleading) but I shall watch with interest the developments. I have a feeling we are not done with Clean Reader yet. http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/mar/27/clean-reader-books-app-censorship-victory-authors-celebrate

There were some excellent explorations about what the existence of such an app means, the best of which was here:

http://www.remittancegirl.org/2015/03/26/clean-readers-profound-illiteracy-the-consumption-of-the-text/

A conversation on Twitter set me to thinking about the relationship between reader and author…

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